Kirkwood Community College

Kirkwood Community College Credit Catalog 2015-2016

Student Academic Dishonesty

Kirkwood students are responsible for authenticating all work in a course. This includes but is not limited to quizzes, exams, presentations, papers, journals, and projects. If asked, the student must be able to produce proof establishing that the work he or she submits is original and created by the student. For this reason, it is recommended that students engage in a verifiable working process on assignments and conduct themselves during class in a manner that does not lead to the suspicion of academic dishonesty.

Students should keep copies of all drafts of original work, make photocopies of research materials, write summaries of research materials, retain Writing Center receipts, keep logs or journals of work on assignments and papers, and save drafts or versions of assignments under individual file names on personal computer or cloud storage devices.

All writing that is taken from secondary sources (including those on the Internet) must have proper attribution and citation as outlined in course requirements and syllabi.

If the instructor suspects academic dishonesty and asks the student to authenticate his or her work, the inability to authenticate the work is grounds for opening an investigation of academic dishonesty. In the event that an instructor or administrator communicates to the student a suspicion of academic dishonesty, the burden of proof rests on the student to establish that he or she was responsible for the creation of his or her own work.

In addition to requiring that students authenticate their work, Kirkwood faculty or their designees may employ various other means of ascertaining authenticity – such as engaging in Internet searches, creating quizzes based on student work, or requiring students to explain their work or process orally.

This policy applies to all credit and noncredit coursework taken at Kirkwood Community College.

Academic dishonesty may include but is not limited to:

  1. Plagiarism and Fabrication
    1. Copying information verbatim from a source without providing proper credit or source attribution.
    2. Paraphrasing a significant portion of another individual’s work without fundamentally changing the main idea and failing to provide proper credit.
    3. Presenting as your own work something that you had no part in creating (this would include obtaining papers or other academic materials by purchasing, borrowing or downloading them from a third party or website).
    4. Creating false data or modifying existing data as part of an assignment or project without the express knowledge and consent of the instructor. This includes false graphs, charts and bibliographic citations.
  2. Misrepresentation
    1. Allowing another individual to represent him or herself as the student to complete a quiz, test or other assessment.
    2. Allowing one’s own name to be part of a project or group assignment for which the individual played no role or had no significant contribution.
    3. Submitting as original work an assignment from a previous course or class unless such prior submission is noted and the original work has been substantially modified or enhanced. Without these changes, the student is guilty of self-plagiarism.
  3. Cheating and Facilitation
    1. Copying from another student’s work during a class on a graded or assessed activity.
    2. Knowingly allowing other students to view or access one’s work during a test or quiz. During in-class assessment, students should ensure that their work is not visible to others and should avoid the appearance of viewing another student’s quiz, exam or other unique work.
    3. Using unauthorized notes (written or electronic) during a quiz or exam. This includes but is not limited to unauthorized notes or formulae on calculators or other devices that are allowed.
    4. Accessing the Internet or other electronic sources during an in-class assessment without the express knowledge and consent of the instructor.
    5. Communicating with another student (either by sending or receiving information) in a way that shares information and answers on graded activities without the express knowledge and consent of the instructor.
    6. Copying, photographing or in any way duplicating part or all of a quiz or test without the permission of the instructor.
  4. Impeding Fair and Equal Access to the Education and Research Process
    1. Hiding, removing or in any way restricting access to information and materials that other students may be required to access in the course of completing an assignment or project. This includes creating passwords or other electronic barriers to access on public or shared websites.

Sanctions

The sanctions for confirmed cheating and plagiarism are as follows:

First offense:

The instructor will communicate with the student about the suspected academic misconduct, including plagiarism or cheating. The instructor will have the authority to issue a failing grade on the paper, exam or assignment for which cheating or plagiarism was established.

The Dean of Students will email the student the following: "Your name has been entered into the database of Student Academic Misconduct with an indication that you have been sanctioned with a First Offense of Student Academic Misconduct. You may be required to complete the Anti-plagiarism Education and submit the results to your faculty member. The consequences of a subsequent violation of the Kirkwood Student Academic Misconduct policy will likely result in failing the course in which that offense occurs."

Students may appeal final course grades using the Academic Appeals process.

Second Offense:

When a student has committed a second offense of misconduct as recorded in the Student Academic Misconduct database, the instructor will have the authority to issue a failing grade for the course in which academic misconduct was established.

The Dean of Students will email the student the following: "Your name has been entered into the database of Student Academic Misconduct with an indication that you have been sanctioned with a Second Offense of Student Academic Misconduct. You may be required to complete the Anti-plagiarism Education and submit the results to your faculty member. The instructor has the right to issue a failing grade for this course. The consequences of any additional violation of the Kirkwood Student Academic Misconduct policy will likely result in a one semester suspension from Kirkwood Community College."

Students may appeal final course grades using the Academic Appeals process.

Third Offense and Subsequent Offenses:

When a student has committed a third offense of misconduct as recorded in the Student Misconduct Database, the Dean of Students will email the student stating: "Your name has been entered into the database of Academic Student Misconduct with an indication that you have been sanctioned with a Third Offense of Student Academic Misconduct. You may be required to complete the Anti-plagiarism Education and submit the results to your faculty member. As a consequence, the instructor has the authority to issue a failing grade for the course in which cheating or plagiarism was established; and you are now subject to a one semester suspension from Kirkwood Community College."

The student may appeal the suspension under the Student Conduct Code appeal process.